New Study Shows the Ancient Irish Dismembered Their Dead Relatives After Death

New Study Shows the Ancient Irish Dismembered Their Dead Relatives After Death

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What the what now?

New insights into the death rites of the ancient people of Ireland have been revealed. And they are a little gross.

The Department of Anatomy at New Zealand’s University of Otago have been studying funerals of ancient Ireland. The findings have been published in the journal Bioarchaeology International.

The new paper, whose lead author is Dr Jonny Geber, focuses on the 5000 years-old Passage Tomb Complex at Carrowkeel in County Sligo in the north-west of Ireland. This site is one of the most impressive Neolithic ritual landscapes in Europe. But despite that, is relatively unknown.

Cairn K – Part of a 5000 year-old Passage Tomb Complex at Carrowkeel in County Sligo in the north-west of Ireland. This site is one of the most impressive Neolithic ritual landscapes in Europe, but despite that, is relatively unknown. Photo credit: Sam Moore

The research team analysed bones from up to seven passage tombs that included both unburnt and cremated human remains from around 40 individuals. Much remains unknown about these Stone Age people.

Dr Geber says he and his colleagues determined that the unburnt bone displayed evidence of dismemberment. “We found indications of cut marks caused by stone tools at the site of tendon and ligament attachments around the major joints, such as the shoulder, elbow, hip and ankle,” he says.

Dr Geber says the new evidence suggest that a complex burial rite was undertaken at Carrowkeel, that involved a funerary rite that placed a particular focus on the “deconstruction” of the body. “This appears to entail the bodies of the dead being ‘processed’ by their kin and community in various ways, including cremation and dismemberment. It was probably done with the goal to help the souls of the dead to reach the next stages of their existence.”

This study has been able to show that the Carrowkeel complex was most likely a highly significant place in Neolithic society in Ireland, and one which allowed for interaction and a spiritual connection with the ancestors.

The evidence suggests that the people of Neolithic Ireland may have shared similar beliefs and ideologies concerning the treatment of the dead with communities beyond the Irish Sea, according to the researchers, Dr Geber says.

So if an Irish relative proposes dismembering you after death, don’t be offended, they are just following original Irish burial rites. Ick!

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1 Comment

  1. EdLawinMD
    June 22, 13:42 Reply
    I don' think this is 'Ick' at all, the Jewish would allow the body to decompose, then collect the bones, and put them in boxes. The Roman's burned their deceased along with the Greeks. Who is to say what a Culture does, is right or wrong. Thank you for in-lighting me on my Ancestors! I think it's amazing what we learn!

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